Deyaun Seale (MHA '18)

A portrait of Deyaun Seale smiling and posing sitting down in a yellow blouse.

Almost as far back as she can remember, Texas Woman’s University graduate student Deyaun Seale has longed for a career in the health care industry. Helping others is important to her, and that’s her passion.

When her mother was diagnosed with cancer three years ago, it hit Seale hard. That her mom is a cancer survivor and is herself pursing a degree in nursing is inspiring. That’s what motivates Seale.

This December, Seale will graduate from TWU’s Houston campus with a master’s degree in health care administration. But that won’t mark the end of her collegiate career. After graduation, she plans to enroll in an accelerated BSN program to get a nursing degree, too.

It’s her goal to be a well-rounded health care professional, who can draw from expertise on the clinical and administrative sides of the industry.

“Nothing has sparked my interest more than helping people,” says Seale, who has worked in health care serving inmate and homeless populations. “Seeing the emotional, financial and physical stress that health concerns have caused members of my family, I think it is important to do what I can to help alleviate that stress for others -- whether it be behind the scenes or front and center.”

As a graduate student, Seale distinguished herself in a number of ways. She was selected as an Experiential Student Scholar, a recognition that honors outstanding achievement and provides an avenue for scholars to apply the research they’ve developed to real-world situations.

Seeing the emotional, financial and physical stress that health concerns have caused members of my family, I think it is important to do what I can to help alleviate that stress for others -- whether it be behind the scenes or front and center.

In Seale’s case, she researched ways to improve operations at a clinic for the homeless she currently works at in Houston. Through mentoring from one of her professors, Anne Selcer, Ph.D., Seale developed a system that incorporates incentives for medical staff members so that they become more engaged in their patient interactions. That system helped improve the quality of overall health care at the clinic.

And that success led to an opportunity for her to present her findings at a recent Association of University Programs in Health Administration conference.

Seale hopes her work experiences serving the homeless and those incarcerated in the correctional system -- coupled with her varied educational credentials -- will better prepare her to launch her post-collegiate career.

“These populations can often be neglected, judged and forgotten. I think it is important to change that and make sure they receive the same care and are treated with the same respect as the general population,” she says. “If I can't understand the struggles clinical staff experience when working with these types of populations, how can I ask them to do things differently?”

Page last updated 9:02 AM, September 14, 2018