Becky Rodriguez (MEd '13)

A portrait of Becky Rodriguez smiling.

As executive director of TWU’s Office of Diversity, Inclusion and Outreach (DIO), Becky Rodriguez draws on her experiences as a first-generation Latina student to serve as a mentor and create programs for TWU students just like her.

Rodriguez holds a BS in interdisciplinary studies and an MEd in educational administration from TWU and currently is working on her PhD in sociology at the university. As a doctoral student, Rodriguez researches race and ethnicity, issues in higher education, social inequality, first-generation student outreach and immigration.

Originally a grant coordinator for TWU’s College of Professional Education (bilingual education), Rodriguez explored opportunities to strengthen student success, especially among students of color. Her work led to a position within DIO.

Rodriguez says, “I was fortunate to have found a position that supports programs and initiatives for underrepresented populations and especially for those who are first-generation college students.”

As a first-generation college student, a Latina and an economically disadvantaged student, I too experienced many of the challenges and opportunities that our students face in college. That is why I believe in mentoring and serving as a resource to all our students here at TWU.

Rodriguez pioneered the way for TWU programs such as the GO Program, on-campus Cultural TALKS, a Multicultural Graduation Celebration and the G-Force Mentoring Program, which has received more than $1.6 million in grants under Rodriguez’s leadership.

The GO Program aims to make higher education more accessible to high school students. TWU currently has 17 GO Centers across North Texas and a Mobile GO Center equipped to bring college resources anywhere. The GO Program is supported by G-Force, a peer mentoring program that builds leadership skills among TWU students and encourages high school students to pursue opportunities in higher education.

Cultural TALKS brings conversation and respectful, productive dialogue on racial and social injustices in today’s society through on-campus speakers and diversity education and training.

It is the greatest feeling to see our students grow and develop into amazing Pioneers. The saddest and happiest days are when I see them walk the stage! I am very proud of their success.

In Rodriguez’s 16 years at TWU, she has mentored countless students and their families as they make the major transition to college.

“As a first-generation college student, a Latina and an economically disadvantaged student, I too experienced many of the challenges and opportunities that our students face in college,” says Rodriguez. “That is why I believe in mentoring and serving as a resource to all our students here at TWU.”

In the future, Rodriguez hopes to continue developing programs to support TWU’s diverse community and act as a mentor.

“It is the greatest feeling to see our students grow and develop into amazing Pioneers,” she says. “The saddest and happiest days are when I see them walk the stage! I am very proud of their success.”

Becky Rodriguez placing a Raza Stole around the neck of a TWU student she mentored at the Multicultural Graduation event.
Becky Rodriguez places a Raza Stole around the neck of a TWU student she mentored during the Multicultural Graduation event.

Page last updated 11:51 AM, September 25, 2018