Pioneer Research at the Mall

Saturday, November 3, 2018

10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Golden Triangle Mall Food Court

2201 S Interstate 35 E, Denton, TX 76205
Free and open to the public

Join faculty and students from Texas Woman’s University as they present their current research projects to the public on Saturday, November 3 at Denton’s Golden Triangle Mall. This interactive event will engage the community in discussions about academic study and increase awareness of the important work happening every day at TWU.

For more information about this event, contact Nasrin Mirsaleh-Kohan, Ph.D., at NMirsalehKohan@twu.edu or 940-898-2035.

Poster Abstracts

Poster Title: USING iNATURALIST TO ENGAGE STUDENTS IN AN INQUIRY DRIVEN INTRODUCTORY COURSE

Author:  Dr. Amy Jo Hammett

TWU Department:  Department of Biology

iNaturalist is an online citizen science platform for observing living things. It combines scientific research and conservation efforts with public education by enabling non-professionals to participate in authentic research experiences at various stages in the scientific process through biodiversity data collection and curation. Ecology Lab students used this tool to catalog organisms occurring on the Texas Woman's University Denton Campus. Groups of students were assigned a portion of the campus. They recorded site data such as weekly temperatures, performed soil and water testing, and practiced sampling techniques. Each group recorded 50+ organisms including microorganisms, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Students were able to participate in citizen science research, contribute to local biodiversity knowledge, utilize taxonomic systems to identify organisms, and apply skills learned in class to an ecology project which can be analyzed in other classes and future semesters.

 

Poster Title: COMPARATIVE STUDY OF STOMATA IN DIVERSE PLANT LINEAGES

Authors:  Urjitha Vardhineni, Dr. Shazia Ahmed, and Dr. Amy Jo Hammett

TWU Department:  Department of Biology

The presented comparative study examines the distribution and density of stomata across evolutionary lineages of plants. The principal purpose of stomata is to take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen to the environment, which are essential parts of photosynthesis. The stomatal density of a plant can regulate water loss rates and CO2 uptake.  The lineages used include; Liverwort, Moss, Lycophyte, Fern, Gymnosperm, and Angiosperm- monocot & dicot. The size and amount of stomata were first determined by using a light microscope to observe 3 leaf samples of each lineage. Detailed pictures were taken using a Scanning Electron Microscope to provide more detailed images of stomatal structure. Results show differences in stomatal density and abundance between the different lineages.  These differences help plants survive in a variety of habitats.

 

Poster Title: HDAC8-H1.3 PROTEIN COMPLEX ASSOCIATION WITH TRANS-GOLGI VESICLES IN THE BREAST CANCER MCF-7 CELLS

Authors:  Elizabeth Meza, Thu Doan, Rhiannon Wold Gonzalez, Carrie Wilks, and Dr. Michael Bergel

TWU Department:  Department of Biology

Histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) and linker histone subtype H1.3 are two proteins associated with chromatin compaction and transcriptional repression. In a screen for complexes between HDACs and H1 proteins, we found that HDAC8 and H1.3 formed a complex. The HDAC8-H1.3 complex was detected in an unexpected cellular location- cycling vesicles in the cytoplasm of MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. Co-localization of the complex with Rab6 and partial colocalization with Rab7 narrowed down the HDAC8-H1.3 complex localization to trans-Golgi vesicles and late endosomes. Mass spectrometry suggested that the HDAC8-H1.3 complex is associated with the vesicular proteins COPA, Sec23A, Sec23B, Sec22B, and clathrin heavy chain 1. Our goal is to determine the functional role of this complex in vesicular trafficking, which is an important component of many biological processes, such as endocrine secretion and neurotransmission.

Acknowledgments: Supported by TWU Department of Biology funds.

 

Poster Title: THE EFFECT OF UVC AND UVB RADIATION ON CHROMATIN CONDENSATION

Authors:  Riruparna Sinha Roy, Mohammad Abbas, Abigail Buliga, Anh Vo, and Dr. Michael Bergel

TWU Department:  Department of Biology

Chromatin, the complex of DNA and associated proteins and RNA, has several levels of organization ranging from the most unfurled fiber to the most compacted chromosomes. Gene expression, DNA replication and DNA repair are cellular functions dependent on the organization of chromatin. This study aims to understand the relationship between UVC or UVB irradiation and compaction of chromatin. A 256 tandemly repeated LacO DNA sequence integrated into the genome of NIH2/4 mouse embryonic fibroblasts was targeted by fluorescently-tagged LacR protein to visualize the hypothesized compaction of chromatin after UVC and UVB irradiation. Currently, we also study UV-induced chromatin compaction using a chromatin compaction fluorescent-dye assay kit in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. By using UVB, we will broaden our understanding of an innate cellular mechanism that protects the DNA from damage due to exposure to solar radiation and decipher the signaling pathway that regulates this response.

Acknowledgments: Supported by Research Enhancement Program TWU.

 

Poster Title: COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES IN EXPERIMENTAL BIOCHEMISTRY RESEARCH

Author:  Dr. Yunxiang Li

TWU Department:  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

To identify an essential amino acid residue in a protein, alanine scan and site-directed mutagenesis are usually carried out in biochemistry research. However, a project requires months even years of time and high expense in laboratory supplies.   Our study involves several computational approaches to narrow down the number of candidates and to find the ones we may be interested. Analysis of Electrostatic Similarities of Proteins (AESOP) module can figure out how an amino acid could play a role in protein subunit interaction and association. With the help of Chimera, we are able to visualize a protein structure into detail and to illustrate how amino acid residues interact with each other.  In current stage, computational methods cannot predict and mimic the reality in protein with hundred percent certainty, but they already provide us many hints to wisely design our follow-up research. 

Acknowledgments: Supported by TWU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

 

Poster Title: CHEMISTRY CLUB AT TEXAS WOMAN'S UNIVERSITY

Authors:  Rylee Valdez, Trent Kyrk, Hortencia Garcia Tijerina, Alexis Christopher, Jada Siverand, Elizabeth Meza, Akinwande Akinniyi, Jacob Cler, Mehgann Mallory, Dr. Yunxiang Li, and Dr. Nasrin Mirsaleh-Kohan

TWU Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry

KEM Club (Kappa Epsilon Mu) is the student organization for the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and is the local student section of the American Chemical Society.  KEM Club plays an integral part of our Denton campus and local community. KEM club focuses on encouraging the interest of chemistry amongst TWU students and community, including younger students in high school, middle school and elementary school. The club hosts and participates in events that emphasize the importance of chemistry and how it plays a part in everyday lives.  Club activities include chemistry magic shows, chemistry week, incorporating civic engagement into projects, community service, the "Calculate it Forward" event and overall promotion of green chemistry.  In this presentation, we will showcase some of our activities and also awards we have received from the American Chemical Society Committee on Education in recognition of the club's commitment to promote chemistry at the university.

Acknowledgments: Supported by TWU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and American Chemical Society.

 

Poster Title: UNDERSTANDING HOW ANTI−CANCER DRUGS KILL CANCER CELLS

Authors:  Sara Williams, Skylar Wappes, Catherine Perez, Liliana Driver, Alejandro Yanez, Alberto Gaspar-Mendoza, and Dr. Nasrin Mirsaleh-Kohan

TWU Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry

Our research at Texas Woman's University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry uses various techniques to study how anticancer drugs modify DNA.  Clinical studies have shown that simultaneous treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs and radiotherapy are one of the more successful strategies in cancer treatment. Drugs such as cisplatin, carboplatin, nedaplatin, and oxaliplatin have been identified as the most effective anticancer drugs. These drugs have been used in treatment of various cancers including neck, head, lung, ovarian, testicular, cervical, and colorectal cancers. However, there are severe potential side effects.  In order to improve new anticancer drugs, we need to understand how drugs currently used kill cancer cells.  In this presentation, we will discuss our findings and the future plans of our research.

Acknowledgments: Supported by the Robert H. Welch Foundation, the TWU College of Art and Sciences, the Chancellor’s Research Fellows Program, the Research Enhancement Program, the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Undergraduate Research Microgrant, and the Quality Enhancement Program.

 

Poster Title: INNOVATIVE CANCER TREATMENTS BASED ON NANOTECHNOLOGY

Authors:  Avione McGhee, Ashik Patel, and Dr. Robby Petros

TWU Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry

Traditional chemotherapeutics continue to induce toxic effects in healthy, non-cancerous cells.  Better targeting of such therapies to only the diseased cells remains an ambitious goal.  The use of nanotechnology in designing better treatments holds great promise in lessening the burden of chemotherapy on patients while simultaneously producing an increased therapeutic effect.  Researchers at TWU are exploring the use of nanoparticles to target and kill cancer cells.  Nanoparticles are known to selectively accumulate in tumors because of the unique characteristics of the blood vessels surrounding the tumor (a phenomenon known as the enhanced permeability and retention effect).  Current efforts at designing suitable nanoparticle formulations for delivering chemotherapeutics to cancer cells will be discussed along with chemotherapeutic free formulations that could potentially be used to kill cancer cells in instances where tumors have become resistant to traditional therapeutics.

Acknowledgments: Supported by Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, the Welch Foundation, and TWU

 

Poster Title: SYNTHESIS OF PROTEIN-DRUG CONJUGATES FOR TREATING CANCER

Authors:  Avione McGhee, Ashik Patel, and Dr. Robby Petros

TWU Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry

Traditional chemotherapeutics continue to induce off-target toxicity due to their small size and ability to escape circulation almost anywhere in the body. One approach to improve the biodistribution of drugs and keep them in circulation longer has been to attach the molecules to proteins or encapsulate them in nanoparticles. These larger constructs are known to remain in circulation longer due to their increased size. Researchers at TWU are working on ways to synthesize both nanoparticle carriers and protein-drug conjugates. These nanoscale delivery vectors are being synthesized via novel cobalt coordination chemistry, which can be used make bioresponsive materials. The chemical bonds utilized are stable under oxidative conditions, which comprises most extracellular space, but can be broken under reducing conditions (intracellular space). Efforts to use this chemistry to reversibly bind doxorubicin and gemcitabine to albumin will be discussed.

Acknowledgments: Supported by Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, the Welch Foundation, and TWU.

 

Poster Title: RECYCLING ELECTRONIC WASTE; A 21ST CENTURY CHALLENGE

Authors:  Akinwande Akinniyi, Renee Phetsopha, and Dr. Gustavo A. Salazar

TWU Department: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

The increasing rate in the production of novel and upgraded technologies that include cellphones, computer, tablets, etc., have produced a dramatic rise in a waste stream known as "e-waste." In general, e-waste constitutes all domestic and business waste containing electronic devices, such as televisions, copiers, fax machines, etc., that are near their end-of-life state. Furthermore, the concomitant complexity of more sophisticated electronic devices combined with the shortening time in their replacement cycle length have made their recycling extremely challenging. Thus, e-waste ends up piling up in municipal landfills causing adverse environmental effects. In this project we give a general description of the main components of e-waste, show the current physical and chemical methodologies for the recycling of e-waste, present our approach in chemical recycling of plastics in e-waste, and overview the current status in environmental policies regarding the proper disposal of e-waste.

Acknowledgments: Supported by the Welch Foundation. 

 

Poster Title: “VEGETARIAN CHEMISTRY”:  GARDEN-INSPIRED DESIGN OF MOLECULES THAT WILL LIGHT UP OUR LIFE

Authors:  Jada Siverand, Mikaela Wilk, Allan Kolek, Reyad Alkhazalah, Nowyer Alshammari, Aminata Diaby, Ramsha Jawaid, and Dr. Manal Omary

TWU Department:  Chemistry and Biochemistry

Research in the Omary lab at TWU aims at the development of novel metal-containing organic materials that have the potential to be utilized in energy-efficient "organic" LED lighting and/or video displays. The research targets improvements over materials currently used in some smartphones or OLED TVs. Can you imagine your future "e-gadget" is folded like a pen in your pocket, and that it can self-operate without the need to be plugged in for hours to charge it up? Can you also imagine that the shingles on your rooftop, your home and car windows, and even your own clothing items have all of a sudden become solar cells that harvest sunlight to provide free electricity to use everywhere? How about recycling your old jewelry items to become drugs or diagnostic tools for cancer and other diseases? Scientific principles founded in carrots, tomatoes, eggplant, and other colored vegetables are being expanded upon to come up with the novel and smart materials for all these apps. 

Acknowledgments: Welch Foundation, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, REP, QEP.

 

Poster Title: SEARCHING FOR THE MOLECULAR BASIS OF CANCER

Authors:  Claudette Fraire, Thomas Sutorius, Bibiana Sparks, Giselle Martinez, and Dr. Richard D. Sheardy

TWU Department:  Chemistry and Biochemistry

The sequence the four building block of the DNA in our cells (Adenine A; Thymine, T; Guanine, G; and Cytidine, C) not only contains genetic information but also contains information related to its own self processing.  When Watson and Crick presented their model of DNA to the world in 1953, the right-handed double helical structure was not only aesthetically beautiful but could also account for the biological activity of DNA as far as replication and transcription are concerned.  It is now recognized that non Watson-Crick structures not only exist in the genome but may play roles in gene regulation.  Thus, unusual DNA structures, such as those discussed here, have been implicated in cancer cell genesis and propagation.  Using biophysical techniques, the Sheardy research group is interested in learning what the fundamental factors are that influence DNA structure and the stability of that structure.

Acknowledgments: Supported in part by the National Science Foundation and the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

 

Poster Title: THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

Author:  Dr. Richard D. Sheardy

TWU Department:  Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

The mission of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is to teach future scientists solid chemical content, good laboratory practices, excellent communication and teamwork skills and a deep sense of social responsibility. We achieve these goals through rigorous course work, research experience and caring mentoring. We offer BS degrees in chemistry and biochemistry (and American Chemical Society-certified versions of the degree plans) and an MS degree in Chemistry. We have outstanding teaching facilities and state of the art instrumentation. Our research is in the areas of biophysics, biochemistry and materials sciences. Our students go on to graduate and medical/dental/pharmacy schools, teaching or directly into jobs in the chemical industry. Our department has been recognized by the Association of American Colleges and Universities for being a leader in incorporating civic engagement and social responsibility into our chemistry and biochemistry majors' curriculum. Recently, faculty from the department were recently awarded the William E. Bennet Award, presented by the National Center for Science and Civic Engagement for their exemplary and extraordinary efforts and activities to promote citizen science.

Acknowledgments: Supported by the Robert A. Welch Foundation (m-0200), Texas Woman's University, the TWU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the American Chemical Society.

 

Poster TitleTWU CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED FOR INNOVATIVE, SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE PROGRAM

Authors: Cynthia Maguire, Dr. Nasrin Mirsaleh-Kohan, and Dr. Richard D. Sheardy

TWU Department: Chemistry and Biochemistry

Abstract: TWU’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry has twice received national recognition in 2018 for innovative and engaging teaching. The Association of American Colleges & Universities (AACU) recognized TWU as being a model for how to make civic learning and democratic engagement an expectation for all students who major in chemistry or biochemistry. The National Center for Science and Civic Engagement (NCSCE) Also recognized TWU for making extraordinary contributions to citizen science education after more than a decade of using civic engagement to successfully draw students’ interest in courses for non-science majors. The department hosts the SENCER Center for Innovation‒Southwest (SCI-SW), part of a national program founded by NCSCE. SCI-SW focuses on three areas of expertise: Environmental Sustainability, Science Teacher Preparation, and Undergraduate Research. 

Acknowledgments: Supported partially by a National Science Foundation grant though the SENCER program of the National Center for Science and Civic Engagement, the Welch Foundation, the Learn by Doing QEP at TWU and the Department of chemistry and biochemistry at TWU.

 

Poster Title: EVALUATION OF TELEHEALTH SERVICES FOR THE OLDER POPULATION:  TRENDS, ECONOMICS, AND SOLUTIONS

Authors:  Yashada Pillai, and Dr. Mari Tietze

TWU Department:  College of Nursing-Dallas

The population of 65 years and above will double by 2050 and the workforce size will not be enough to sustain efficient healthcare. Studies suggest that this population has a longer life expectancy accompanied by high risk of disease and associated expenses. The purpose of this study is to explore the future state of telehealth care for the elderly, to investigate needed changes for improvements, and to consider the ensuing economic impact. The participants in the study were 65 years and older, of all genders, races, ethnicities, and health backgrounds. The studies focused on innovative technologies for telehealth, comprised of remote diagnostic visits, in-home monitoring, and mobile applications. Results suggested that innovative telehealth technologies are yielding improvement in care delivery in the older population, and that patient satisfaction, economics, and certain security/privacy characteristics are in need of detailed consideration. In addition to applying innovative technologies appropriately to achieve improved healthcare outcomes, it is recommended that reimbursement structures, changing government healthcare policies, and patient adaptation be further considered.

 

Poster Title: THE POWER OF HANDWASHING

Authors:  Amy Pham, Amanda Tricomi, and Dr. Chin-Nu Lin

TWU Department:  College of Nursing-Dallas

Handwashing is the leading preventative measure for spread of illnesses (Atienza et al., 2017, pp. 1). The homeless community has limited access to hand washing facilities and may lack the education regarding proper hand hygiene. The Center for Disease Control provides a set of instructions on how to properly engage in hand washing, which includes wetting the hands, lathering them with soap, scrubbing them, rinsing, and drying (CDC, 2018). It is important for the general population to know how to properly and thoroughly engage in the process of hand washing, know when hand washing is needed, and understand the proper use of hand-sanitizers if soap and clean water are unavailable.

 

Poster Title: SERVICE LEARNING PROJECT: SAFE MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION

Authors:  Obioma Nkwonta, Alexandria Takacs, and Dr. Chin-Nu Lin

TWU Department:  College of Nursing-Dallas

There are many Americans who are taking at least one medication or vitamin supplement each day. In the impoverished communities, many are not taking their medications every day or in the correct manner. Through this Service Learning project, we will focus on how to read label and signs, what questions to ask the doctors and nurses, why it is important not to share medication with other people, and how to properly store meds.        

Acknowledgments: Supported by the TWU Dallas Nursing Department.

 

Poster Title: EIGHT INFERNAL GENERALS:  RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN RELIGIOUS PRACTICE AND HEALTH IN TAIWAN

Author:  Dr. Chin-Nu Lin

TWU Department:  College of Nursing-Dallas

Religion plays a vital role in peoples' perception of health, illness and life process including death. Religious factors, therefore, have similar impact on health as ethnic and cultural heritage. Practicing religious activities (prayer and attending religious services) that help alleviate health problems are a common social norm in Taiwan where religious faith is polytheistic and is expressed and manifested by many forms and type of temple activities. One such activity is the "Eight Infernal Generals", which is a popular religious practice and a major temple activity in Taiwan.

 

Poster Title: NUTRITION EDUCATION FOR HEALTH IMPROVEMENT

Authors:  Kaitlyn Dodson, Anna Hughes, Jennifer Weber, and Dr. Chin-Nu Lin

TWU Department:  College of Nursing-Dallas

A basic understanding of health and nutrition is important to everyone for disease prevention and feeling healthy especially at risk populations such as the homeless. Making informed, healthy choices by knowing and what food groups to pick from, how to read labels, how to store food, and what foods to avoid will allow individuals to make informed, healthy decisions. Knowing how to maintain a healthy diet can reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, anemia, some cancers, obesity, and osteoporosis. A healthy diet can also help fight infection, improve energy levels, and help control inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases. Simple changes in eating habits can make a profound positive impact on long term health.

 

Poster Title: PLAY THERAPY AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT:  EVOLUTION AND APPLICATION OF LOCAL RESEARCHED PRACTICE

Authors:  Dr. Pedro Blanco, and Nicole Carroll

TWU Department: Family Sciences

The purpose of this research practice presentation is to present recent research on play therapy and academic achievement in both populations of at-risk and normal functioning students. These studies include both long-term play therapy and short-term play therapy methods. Using a population of elementary school students, short-term play therapy studies demonstrate the variety of impact that in-school play therapy can have for students. This includes the impact of  short-term play therapy on child academic achievement, and self-regulation with academically at-risk students. Other studies have also demonstrated the impact of bi-weekly short-term play therapy on improvement of academic performance in at-risk students, as well as bi-weekly short term play therapy on the improvement of academic performance in normal functioning students. All of the studies were conducted within the local school district.

 

Poster Title: THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING INITIATIVE: CREATING OPTIMAL WELLBEING FOR STUDENTS

Authors:  Paloma N. Silva, Thad Mantaro, and Jessi Harbor

TWU Department: Health and Wellbeing Initiative

The Texas Woman's University Health and Wellbeing Initiative is a Chancellor-led commitment to improving the lives of our students, employees and community members. The Initiative supports optimal wellness for students by guiding collaborative initiatives through a Collective Impact model. The mission of the Initiative is to create and sustain a culture of wellbeing for TWU students that ensures a lifetime of success and thriving. It is our vision to create a nationally-recognized model for wellbeing that improves students' lives, champions faculty, and staff expertise, fosters new collaborations, and enhances our institutional identity. We are presenting this information today to share with you an example of TWU's remarkable program.   

 

Poster Title: MAKING SENSE OF CENTS

Authors:  Dr. Winifred Mallam, Mariana Floran, Michelle Gaspar, Destini Lemard, and Dulce Vargas

TWU Department: Mathematics and Computer Science

Personal financial literacy is a content strand of the K-8 mathematics Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Students develop financial literacy skills as they will work with money. As preservice teachers we developed a lesson for first grade students that focuses on identifying money and determining the value of a collection of coins. We will share the activities that progress from concrete (hands-on) to pictorial to abstract along with relevant literature.

 

Poster Title: ADDING AND SUBTRACTING WITH 10 FRAMES

Authors:  Dr. Winifred Mallam, Elisa Alderman, Karyn Lucier, Brittney Crosby, and Dana Williston

TWU Department:  Mathematics and Computer Science

When students are learning addition and subtraction in kindergarten, teachers can use various manipulatives to model the skills. One of these is the 10-Frame. We will model how students can concretely develop the fact family for 10 using the 10-Frame. We will follow up with problems solved at the pictorial level using 10-Frames.

 

Poster Title: PIZZA PARTY TIME

Authors:  Dr. Winifred Mallam, Hannah Duncan, Alana Endre, Ashtyn Polk, and D'Kevion Traylor

TWU Department:  Mathematics and Computer Science

Students like pizza and they have to pay for it with money. Our group will share mathematics activities that incorporate pizza and money. We will demonstrate concrete and pictorial examples that teachers can use with 2nd grade students as they share pizza and money amongst themselves using concrete objects and pictorial representations.

 

Poster Title: DIVISION IN SHARING 

Authors:  Dr. Winifred Mallam, Grace Alejos, Kim Henderson, Emily Schwartz, and Brittani Sims

TWU Department: Mathematics and Computer Science

As future teachers we will share a lesson focusing on division of whole numbers for 2nd grade students. We will model division using concrete models and pictorial representations.

 

Poster Title: REPEATING PATTERNS

Authors:  Dr. Winifred Mallam, Selena Hernandez, Alejandra Tierrafria, and Nadah Eltiar

TWU Department:  Mathematics and Computer Science

We developed the theme for our presentation on an article published in Teaching Children Mathematics, a journal published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. We will model a lesson for kindergarten students where they use candy to explain patterns, create equations, and form different shapes.

 

Poster Title: PAPER PLATE FRACTIONS

Authors:  Dr. Winifred Mallam, Melissa Alonso, Alexa Farrell, Holly Manos and Rachel Vincent

TWU Department:  Mathematics and Computer Science

When teaching mathematics, teachers can use everyday items to catch the attention of their students. We will demonstrate how paper plates can be used in the second grade classroom when teaching the concept of fraction.

 

Poster Title: AN EXAMINATION OF THE CLASS I FLUTE QUARTET LITERATURE ON THE TEXAS UIL PRESCRIBED MUSIC LIST

Authors:  Caitlin Rose, Paula Hartsough, David Wright, Jacob Wright, and Dr. Danielle Woorlery

TWU Department:  Music

The purpose of this project is to assess the Class 1 Flute Quartets on the University Interscholastic League Prescribed Music List (UIL PML), and to create an annotated guide of these findings.  The UIL PML is a state approved collection of repertoire used for competitions within the state of Texas that is divided into three difficulty levels, of which the Class 1 selections are the most advanced.  Our assessments will be based off of the criteria used by the National Flute Association Pedagogy Committee, and modified to create a comprehensive pedagogical guide that incorporates performance suggestions, technical challenges, and specific musical characteristics into an easy to read document.  This guide will serve as a resource for band directors, private teachers, and performers to aid in the selection of appropriate ensemble music of varying levels and to increase the variety of ensemble music to which flute students are exposed.

Acknowledgments: Supported by Experiential Student Scholar Program.

 

Poster Title: DISGUST MODERATES RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PARTICIPANT SKIN TONE AND RACIAL PERCEPTIONS OF JESUS

Authors:  Haylie Jones, JohnMark Kempthorne, Gabrielle Smith, John A. Terrizzi, Jr., India Robinson, Jessica Alexander, Jasmine Williams, Dr. Gabrielle Smith

TWU Department:  Psychology and Philosophy

Disgust functions to keep our world simply categorized, where everything fits neatly into a box. In this study, disgust moderated the relationship between participant skin tone and the chosen skin tone of Jesus and Santa Claus. That is, those who are more sensitive to disgust preferred a Jesus or Santa Claus with a skin tone similar to their own.

 

Poster Title: MAKING SENSE OF BLOOM’S TAXONOMY USING SIGN LANGUAGE

Authors:  Sarah Jennings, Paloma Navarrete, Ariel Floyd, and Dr. Rebecca Fredrickson

TWU Department: Teacher Education

Bloom's Taxonomy is used in education as a pedagogical tool to help learners reach higher levels of critical thinking. This presentation is an explanation of Bloom's Taxonomy using the lens of deaf culture. All three authors are studying deaf education and this allowed them to turn their understanding of higher order thinking skills and sign language into a blended medium. 

 

Poster Title: BOLDLY LEARNING BY DOING:  WORKING WITH DIVERSE LEARNERS THROUGH A COMMUNITY READING PROGRAM

Authors:  Victoria Walker, Gwendolyn Young, Alizabeth Worthington, Karissa Higley, Meghan Gerlach, Victoria Gregston, and Dr. Rebecca Fredrickson

TWU Department:  Teacher Education

In the past several years, TWU Teacher Education students have taken the concept of "Learn by Doing" to new heights as the concept of experiential learning has worked its way into the overarching philosophy at the institution. This study examines several preservice teaching students who participated in this community reading program. This program was developed in conjunction with a community partnership with Barnes and Noble of Denton. Through this activity, preservice teachers develop thematic lessons to present to children in the community on a monthly basis during the academic year and on a weekly basis during the summer. This study explores the preservice teachers' perceptions and reflections on their personal growth as a teacher through this experience. Some of the reoccurring themes include increased expertise of instructional practices, greater knowledge of children's literature, practical classroom management skills, and working with diverse learners.

 

Poster Title: GRADUATE RESEARCH @ TWU:  EXPLORING THE DISSERTATIONS AND THESES COMMUNITY IN THE REPOSITORY@TWU

Authors:  Amanda Zerangue, Stephany Compton, Adrian Shapiro, and Meti Tmava

TWU Department:  TWU Libraries

The robust scholarly output of graduate students at Texas Woman's University (TWU) can be accessed by a global audience within TWU's institutional repository, the Repository@TWU. Specifically, every thesis and dissertation authored by TWU graduates from 2012 through the present can be accessed, in full, by researchers worldwide, except for those theses and dissertations which are under an embargo. The dual impact of this global exposure via the Repository@TWU includes an increase in the scholarly impact of TWU graduate students, as well as an opportunity to create strategic, discipline-specific research partnerships post-graduation. This poster presentation will explore the topics of research found within the TWU Dissertations and Theses Community in the Repository@TWU, down to the granular level of college, department, subject, and author supplied keywords. We hope to answer the overarching question-- what are graduate students researching at TWU? 

 

Poster Title: COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS THROUGH SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

Authors:  Kimberly Johnson, Shelia Bickle, Jimmie Lyn Harris, Amanda Mims, Megan Haase, and Kristin Clark

TWU Department: TWU Libraries

Why are special collections so special? They offer insight into our understanding of our communities and showcase its history. The special collections at Texas Woman's University documents women's roles in society and their impact on our communities. Founded in 1932, the Woman's Collection is one of the oldest repositories devoted to collecting the history of women in the United States with the largest concentration of resources about women in Texas and women in the Southwest. TWU's Special Collections staff provides instruction and research support to its students and faculty and are committed to sharing its historical documents with the community. Staff provide programming and outreach to community groups on women's history, offer workshops and seminars on preservation techniques, and serve our youngest community members with enriching children's programming. The special collections include history about the university and Denton County that support genealogists throughout Denton.

Page last updated 10:50 AM, October 30, 2018