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NEW SCHOLARSHIP AIMED AT HELPING WOMEN SUCCEED

TWU READING DEPARTMENT ADDRESSES ADOLESCENT LITERACY

NEWSBRIEFS

UPDATE ON TWU PEOPLE

THE NEXT TWO WEEKS AT TWU: JULY 3-16, 2006

 


Volume 28, Number 22, July 3-16, 2006

NEW SCHOLARSHIP AIMED AT HELPING WOMEN SUCCEED

Texas Woman’s University and a new non-profit organization are giving women a second chance at a college degree and a career.

Empowering Women as Leaders, a non-profit organization headquartered in Southlake, was formed in 2004 with the goal of providing financial support and mentoring for women over age 23 to earn a degree. EWL partnered with Texas Woman’s University to establish its scholarship program and identify scholarship candidates.

“We looked at colleges in the Dallas/Fort Worth area that are supportive of women,” EWL founder and president Carolyn Pineda said. “We are extremely fortunate to have TWU as a partner to help us get started.”

Dr. Richard Nicholas, TWU’s vice president for student life, said the partnership with EWL was a natural for the university.

“Their goal to assist women, especially nontraditional-aged women, to complete their education has been a mission of TWU’s for a long time,” he said. “The mentoring aspect of the scholarship may have as much, if not more, value to the students than the dollars. It’s more than a donation; it’s a relationship. It’s a measure of the commitment these women have to helping other women.”

Scholarships are provided to women ages 24 and older who are regarded as having a high potential for success. In addition to the $1,500 per year provided by the scholarship, recipients, who are called“Stars,” will receive mentoring throughout college and for the first two years of their career. Those Stars then go on to mentor new Stars in the program.

Ms. Pineda, vice president of professional services for Sabre Holdings in Southlake, said that pairing the Stars with women who have achieved success in the workplace helps them prepare professionally and provides them with emotional support.

“Many people who go to college later are worried about returning to school,” said Ms. Pineda, adding that she started college at age 26. “It’s essential to have support at that time in your life.”

Though EWL initially planned to sponsor only one student its first year, two recipients were selected. Galynn Draper-Lindemann of Denton graduated in May with a bachelor of social work degree and has entered TWU’s Executive MBA program. Vanessa Lee White of Dallas received her bachelor of fine arts degree in photography in May.

For more information on EWL, go to www.empoweringwomenasleaders.org.

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TWU READING DEPARTMENT ADDRESSES ADOLESCENT LITERACY

The concept of implementing “reading across the curriculum” in America’s schools is gaining attention as more emphasis is being placed on adolescent literacy issues. One Texas Woman’s University reading professor says the movement goes beyond teaching students “how” to read to gaining a better understanding of “what” they’re reading.

“Schools haven’t been doing a good job of preparing students to adequately read more complex texts as they move through the grades,” said Dr. Lettie Albright, assistant professor of reading at TWU.

“Students can’t learn by being fed information. When they begin their career, they often don’t know how to apply what they’ve read. If they’re accustomed to just spitting out information, they can’t do it.”

A recent report by ACT, an independent organization that provides college assessment exams, among other services, revealed that many high school students graduate without the reading skills they’ll need to succeed in college and in workforce training programs.

The report, titled, “Reading Between the Lines,” found that only about half of the nearly 1.2 million 2005 high school graduates who took the ACT college admissions and placement exam met the College Readiness Benchmark for Reading. The full report may be found at www.act.org/path/policy/pdf/reading_report.pdf.

The TWU Department of Reading addresses the issue of adolescent literacy through a partnership with the Arlington Independent School District. The program, which uses Title 1 funds to help teachers earn master’s degrees in reading, draws not only reading teachers, but math, special education and career exploration teachers as well, Dr. Albright said.

“These teachers from urban Title 1 schools have many students with different backgrounds,” she said. “We’re exploring ways to tap into students’ interests and strengths.”

Though many students say they’re not interested in reading, Dr. Albright believes they’re just reading different things. “Some kids say they aren’t readers, but they’ll read on a computer for hours. They’ll read video game manuals, magazines and other materials,” she said.

Dr. Albright believes students need to be exposed to different, multicultural texts. “Texts used in the classroom often are traditional Western, white male texts that ignore diversity. This turns some of the students off reading because they don’t see themselves.”

Dr. Albright said one of the main focal points of adolescent literacy is teaching students to understand what they read — to question the text and question what the author is trying to say.

“Reading is more than understanding words,” she said. “It’s creating meaning out of the words.”

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NEWSBRIEFS

Information and news about activities, programs or TWU people may be sent to the Office of Marketing and Communication through campus mail or by e-mail to info@twu.edu. The deadline to receive information is the first and third Tuesday of each month at 5 p.m. for the following week. Student information for the “People” section is not published unless it is submitted by or in conjunction with a faculty member and that faculty member’s related activities.

The TWU School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) will host the Institute for Scientific Information’s Samuel Lazerow Memorial Lecture at 2 p.m. in ASB 313. Admission is free. A reception will follow in Stoddard Hall 402. Dr. David Levy, a professor in The Information School at the University of Washington, will speak on “Information and the Quality of Life: Environmentalism for the Information Age.” For more information, call 8-1-2602.

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UPDATE ON TWU PEOPLE

Please submit “People” items (faculty and staff only) to the Office of Marketing and Communication by campus mail or by e-mail to info@twu.edu. Include first and last names (no initials, please) and appropriate titles (ie. Dr.).

President George W. Bush recently nominated Dr. Robert S. Martin (SLIS) as a member of the National Council on the Humanities for a term expiring Jan. 26, 2012. The nomination requires approval by the U.S. Senate

Dr. Claire L. Sahlin (women’s studies) presented a lecture titled, “Gender and Paradoxes of Authority: Birgitta of Sweden and the Archbishop of Naples,” at Seconda Universita degli Studi di Napoli, Santa Maria Capus Vetere, Italy, on May 10.

Dr. Claire L. Sahlin (women’s studies) participated in a session on “Standards for Reappointment, Tenure, and Promotions in Women’s Studies,” at the Program Administration and Development Pre-conference, National Women’s Studies Association, Oakland, Calif., on June 15.

Dr. Susan Chaney and Elizabeth Fuentes (nursing-Dallas) published the article “Genitourinary Tract Infections in Men: Key Strategies for Nurse Practitioners” in the June 2006 issue of the journal Advance for Nurse Practitioners.

Dr. Kathryn Tart (nursing-Houston) passed the National League for Nursing Certified Nurse Educator CM (CNE) Examination.

Dr. Barbara Lerner (P-16 Initiatives) was invited to serve on a nine-member team representing the state of Texas at the NASH (National Association of System Heads)/Education Trust State Teams K-16 Summer Institute July 23-25 in Big Sky, Mont. The goals of the institute are to enhance educator quality, accelerate student success across P-12 and post-secondary education, and strengthen P-16 data systems crucial to informed decision-making.

Joan Edwards (nursing-Houston) presided over the 2006 convention of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) June 24-28 in Baltimore, Md. AWHONN serves more than 22,000 health care professionals in the U.S., Canada and abroad. The title of the conference was “Innovate, Lead, Care.” Dr. Sandra Cesario (nursing-Houston) presented two papers at this conference titled: “Newborn Abandonment: Policies, Practice, and Pregnant Women” and “A Square Peg in a Round Hole: Can Ethnicity of Parents Contribute to High C-Section Rates?”

Chalese Connors (athletics) is a 2006 graduate of the NACWAA/HERS Institute for Administrative Advancement, an annual residential weeklong intensive management training program designed for coaches and administrators in intercollegiate athletics administration. The partnership between the National Association of Collegiate Women Athletics Administration and Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) Mid-America began 12 years ago.

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THE NEXT TWO WEEKS AT TWU: JULY 3-16, 2006
Mon., July 3 - Library open 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fitness & Recreation open 6 a.m. to midnight

Tues., July 4 -Independence Day holiday. University closed.

Wed., July 5 - Library open 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fitness & Recreation open 6 a.m. to midnight

Thur., July 6 -Library open 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fitness and Recreation open 6 a.m. to midnight

Fri., July 7 -Library open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Fitness and Recreation open 6 a.m.-10 p.m.
-“Understanding, Assessing and Treating Disaster Survivors,” 8:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m., ACT. Cost varies. 8-1-3408.

Sat., July 8 -Library open 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; bookstore closed; Fitness & Recreation open 8 a.m. to noon.

Sun., July 9 -Library open 2-10 p.m.; bookstore closed; Fitness & Recreation open 2-10 p.m.

Mon., July 10 -Library open 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fitness & Recreation open 6 a.m.-midnight
-Kids Summer Dance, 1-5 p.m., Dance Building. Cost: $175. 8-1-3408

Tues., July 11 -Library open 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Fitness & Recreation open 6 a.m. to midnight

Wed., July 12 -Library open 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Fitness & Recreation open 6 a.m. to midnight

Thur., July 13 -Library open 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fitness & Recreation open 6 a.m. to midnight
-Institute for Scientific Information Samuel Lazerow Memorial Lecture, 2 p.m., ASB 313. Free. 8-1-2602

Fri., July 14 -Library open 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; bookstore open 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Fitness and Recreation open 6 a.m.-10 p.m.

Sat., July 15 -Library open 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; bookstore closed; Fitness & Recreation open 8 a.m.-noon.
-Online Degree Information Session, 8:30 a.m.-noon, ACT. Free. 8-1-3014

Sun., July 16 -Library open 2-10 p.m.; bookstore closed; Fitness & Recreation open 2-10 p.m.

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