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TWU NURSING PROGRAMS RECEIVE CCNE ACCREDITATION

TWU RECEIVES MEADOWS FOUNDATION GRANT

TWU HOSTS CAMP FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED STUDENTS

UPDATE ON TWU PEOPLE

FACULTY RECEIVE GRANTS

THE NEXT THREE WEEKS AT TWU: July 19-Aug. 8, 2004

Volume 26, Number 19, July 19-Aug. 8, 2004

TWU NURSING PROGRAMS RECEIVE CCNE ACCREDITATION

The baccalaureate and master’s degree programs in the TWU College of Nursing have been accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) for a ten-year period — the maximum length of accreditation granted. The accreditation comes without any compliance concerns or areas identified as needing improvement.

“The TWU College of Nursing has been providing students with a quality education and Texas residents with the highest-caliber nurses for 50 years,” said Dr. Carolyn Gunning, interim provost and former dean of the college. “This accreditation, especially coming without any concerns, is another yardstick for measuring that quality. Obviously, if you receive accreditation without concerns, you’re doing what you need to do.”

The CCNE is recognized by the U.S. secretary of education as a national accreditation agency for baccalaureate and master’s nursing programs.

The TWU College of Nursing, the largest nursing program in Texas with more than 2,200 students, celebrates its 50th anniversary this year. In its five decades, the college has produced more than 12,000 nurses on the university’s Denton, Dallas and Houston campuses.

The TWU College of Nursing was the first to launch an accelerated undergraduate nursing degree program in Texas, and received a Texas Higher Education Star Award from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for a nursing student retention program. TWU students’ first-time pass rate of 95.4 percent on the nursing licensure exam in 2002-2003 was higher than the state average (90.8 percent) and the national average (87.2 percent).

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TWU RECEIVES MEADOWS FOUNDATION GRANT

TWU will use a $25,000 matching grant from the Meadows Foundation of Dallas to teach Spanish to teachers in six area school districts.

Teachers, administrators and support staff in the Denton, Lewisville, Carrollton-Farmers Branch, Irving, Sanger and McKinney school districts will take Command Spanish® classes in the fall so they can better interact with Spanish-speaking students and their parents. Command Spanish® is a Spanish for the workplace course. The training includes words and phrases that are most commonly used in a specific profession, such as health care professions, education, construction and law enforcement. Typically, students complete the course in two days.

"The ability of teachers to communicate with their students is a key factor in successful learning," said Meadows Foundation President and CEO Linda Evans. "With an increasing number of Texas students who speak English as a second language, the ability of teachers to speak Spanish will be a valuable tool in helping these young people stay in school and achieve academic proficiency. We are pleased that the Meadows Foundation can assist the university in expanding this important program."

Some teachers in Denton, Irving and Sanger ISDs already have completed the course and gave it high marks. “The course was just what our staff needed to begin communicating with students and parents on a daily basis,” said Anthony Sims, principal of Calhoun Middle School in Denton ISD. “It’s a course that can be used to communicate the very next day after the class.”

The Meadows Foundation is a private philanthropic institution established in 1948 by Algur H. and Virginia Meadows to benefit the people of Texas. Foundation grants support work in the fields of arts and culture, civic and public affairs, education, health and human services. The foundation also has a particular interest in three areas: public education, particularly in the areas of early child development, enhanced reading skills and teacher preparation; mental health and the environment.

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TWU HOSTS CAMP FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED STUDENTS

Two-dozen visually impaired young people played baseball, scaled a climbing wall and participated in other activities during Camp Life, held July 11-17 at TWU.

“The visually impaired students I work with really don’t get the opportunity to experience sports and summer camp,” said Vicki Foederer, an adaptive physical education teacher in Dallas and master’s degree student in kinesiology at TWU who conceived the idea. “I wanted to do something for them that is fun and provides them with new experiences.”

Camp Life students, ages 12-18, enjoyed playing baseball, disc golf, swimming, bowling, use of the university’s climbing wall, attended the theater, enjoyed an ice cream social and participated in a scavenger hunt, among other activities.

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UPDATE ON TWU PEOPLE

Please submit “People” items (faculty and staff only) to the office of marketing and communication by campus mail or by e-mail to info@twu.edu. Include first and last names (no initials, please) and appropriate titles (ie. Dr.)

Michael Springer and Dr. William Cissell (health studies), who are the director and principal investigator, respectively, of the Statewide Coordinated Statement of Need (SCSN) Project, participated in a meeting of the steering committee for the project on June 24-28. The meeting was held to approve plans for preparing the Statement of Need document for final approval by the Texas Department of Health prior to submission to the Health Resources and Services Administration on July 30. TWU, through the Department of Health Studies, manages the SCSN Project, which provides guidance to HIV/AIDS agencies on how to do medical and social services needs assessments of HIV patients.

Dr. Susan Chaney (nursing-Dallas) was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award by the Alumni Association of Scott & White School of Nursing, in Temple, for her contributions to nursing. The award was presented June 26.

On June 19, Dr. Claire Sahlin (women's studies) gave a presentation titled “Religion in Women's Studies Classrooms: Strategies for Negotiating and Transforming Student Resistance” at the National Women's Studies Association in Milwaukee, Wis.

Dr. Anne Scott Stiles (nursing) recently attended a two-week workshop at the University of Minnesota Institute of Child Development, which focused on learning how to code maternal-infant videotapes for infant attachment using Ainsworth's Strange Situation Procedure, a 20-minute structured laboratory observation using a 12-to-18-month old infant, mother and stranger. Infant attachment refers to the infant's ability to use his mother as a secure base to achieve a balance of exploration and intimacy.

Helping Hands, the student volunteer group at TWU, will receive the Outstanding Community Partner Award from Keep Denton Beautiful on July 22. Recently, the group received the Outstanding Higher Education Adopter Award from the Denton ISD Adopt A School Program and the Outstanding School Adopter Award from Tomas Rivera Elementary School.

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FACULTY RECEIVE GRANTS

Dr. Joann Engelbrecht (research and sponsored programs) announced the following faculty have received grants:

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THE NEXT THREE WEEKS AT TWU: July 19-Aug. 8, 2004

July 19-22

Fri., July 23

Sat., July 24

Sun., July 25

July 26-29

Fri., July 30

Sat., July 31

Sun., Aug. 1

Aug. 2-4

Aug. 5-6

Sat., Aug. 7

Sun., Aug. 8


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