TWU SIFE TEAM HEADS TO NATIONALS

COLLEGE FOR A DAY MARKS FOURTH ANNIVERSARY

TWU DRAMA DEPARTMENT PRODUCTION IS FAMILY FARE

JAMP STUDENTS NAMED

GRANTS ANNOUNCED

UPDATE ON TWU PEOPLE

THE NEXT TWO WEEKS AT TWU: May 17-30, 2004

 

Volume 26, Number 15, May 17-30, 2004

TWU SIFE TEAM HEADS TO NATIONALS

The TWU Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE) team has qualified for the 2004 SIFE USA National Exposition, to be held in Kansas City, Mo., May 23-25. This is the fourth time a TWU team has advanced to national competition.

The team qualified for nationals after winning regional championships April 8 in Dallas, their fourth regional win in the past five years. “We are at the point where other university professors send some of their team members in to watch us because we have set a benchmark,” said SIFE advisor Sherrie Taylor (School of Management).

TWU team members are Andrea Wensowitch of Ennis, Judylynn Nooyen of Eugene, Ore., Nina Trofimova of Gainesville, Mitzi Kingma of Grangeville, Idaho, Andrew Dartt of Denton, Brittanie Graswich of Trophy Club and Briza Alvardo of El Paso.

During national competition, more than 180 SIFE teams will each present a 24-minute multi-media summary of the educational outreach projects they developed and implemented throughout the year. Panels drawn from more than 200 of the nation’s top businesses and community leaders will judge teams.

The TWU team’s outreach projects included working with the Young Entrepreneurs Club operating the school store at Denton ISD’s Strickland Middle School, and working with residents at Good Samaritan Retirement Center in Denton about senior fraud awareness.

Along with Taylor, Dr. David Rylander serves as an advisor to the SIFE team. Both TWU instructors are Sam M. Walton Free Enterprise Fellows.

Founded in 1975 and active on more than 1,500 college and university campuses in 37 countries, SIFE is a non-profit organization that works in partnership with business and higher education to provide students the opportunity to make a difference and to develop leadership, teamwork and communication skills through learning, practicing and teaching principles of free enterprise.

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COLLEGE FOR A DAY MARKS FOURTH ANNIVERSARY

One hundred and fifty-two fifth and sixth graders from Daniel “Chappie” James Learning Center in Dallas and Newton Rayzor Elementary School in Denton participated in TWU’s 4th Annual College for a Day program, hosted by the chancellor’s office on April 23.

The purpose of the community outreach program is to introduce the idea of higher education and the importance of a college degree to students at a young age and to help them realize that it can be a reality. The students learned about preparing for college, participated in either dance or kinesiology labs, watched the Khem-Lab Magic Show and enjoyed a boxed lunch provided by Grandy’s.

Faculty and staff who assisted with the program include: Dr. Charlotte Sanborn (kinesiology), Dr. Bettye Meyers (kinesiology), Dr. Penelope Hanstein (dance), Mary Williford-Shade (dance), Dr. Vic Ben-Ezra (kinesiology), Dr. Kyle Biggerstaff (kinesiology), Dr. Young-Hoo Kwon (kinesiology), Dr. Nancy Meagher (chemistry), Georgia Kousoulis (admissions), Amy McDonald (chancellor’s office), Corin Walker (instructional support services), as well as TWU students.

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TWU DRAMA DEPARTMENT PRODUCTION IS FAMILY FARE

A story of love and acceptance is told through the use of poetry and American Sign Language as the TWU Drama Department presents Mother Hicks at 7 p.m. Friday, May 21, in the Redbud Theatre. There is no charge for admission. For group ticket reservations and other information, call 8-1-2518.

Mother Hicks takes place during the Great Depression in a small, southern Illinois town beset with illness, drought and a failed economy. The townspeople, looking for someone to blame, focus on Mother Hicks, an eccentric woman who lives alone at the top of Dug Hill. They say she’s a witch, but only two other town outcasts — Tuc, a young deaf man; and an orphan known only as Girl — know the truth.

The play, written by Susan Zeder, one of the nation’s leading playwrights for family audiences, explores the roots of prejudice and looks at fear bred of misunderstanding. In doing so, it speaks to the redeeming power of acceptance and love.

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JAMP STUDENTS NAMED

A Denton and a Fort Worth resident make up the second set of Joint Admission Medical Program (JAMP) students at TWU, according to Dr. James Johnson (chemistry). Thelma Lindsey is a 2003 graduate of Denton High School and Ana Martinez is a 2003 graduate of Northside High School in Fort Worth. Both are biology majors at TWU.

JAMP was created by Senate Bill 940 during the 77th Texas Legislature. The program supports highly qualified, economically disadvantaged students interested in pursing a medical career. The program provides undergraduate and medical school scholarships, as well as stipends so the students can participate in summer internships during their freshman, sophomore and junior years.

JAMP participants automatically receive admission to one of the state’s eight medical schools if they successfully complete all program requirements.

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GRANTS ANNOUNCED

Dr. Joann Engelbrecht (research and sponsored grants) announced the following faculty and administrators have received grants:

Dr. Lynda Uphouse (biology) received $513,092 from the PHS-National Institutes of Health for the period from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005 for the continuation of the Multi-ethnic Biomedical Research Support (MBRS) program. The program is designed to increase the number of minority students who successfully complete a baccalaureate degree in the biomedical sciences, increase the number of minority students who pursue advanced degrees in the biomedical sciences and increase academic and career competitiveness of TWU MBRS students.

Dr. William Cissell (health studies) received $354,407 as a subcontract from the Texas Department of Health on a grant from PHS-Health Resources and Services Administration for the period from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005 for the continuation for the Texas Statewide Coordination Statement of Need project. TWU faculty and staff will provide logistical and technical assistance to planning entities that guide provisions of medical and social services and prevention programs under the Reauthorization of the Ryan White CARE Act.

Dr. Jack Gill (chemistry and physics) received $25,000 from the Welch Foundation for the period from June 1, 2004 to May 31, 2005 for the continuation of the Welch Departmental Grant. The grant supports chemical research by members of the chemistry faculty and also provides opportunities for students to study chemistry in a less structured way and provide students with tools they need to gain and develop an interest in pursuing chemistry as a career.

Dr. Richard Nicholas (student life) received $30,000 from the U.S. Department of Labor for the period from Dec. 18, 2003 to June 20, 2004 for the TWU First Generation College Student Program. The program is designed to provide mentoring and other services to four high schools in Dallas and Denton counties with the goal of increasing first generation higher education enrollment from students in those schools, and to increase retention rates of first generation students at TWU.

Dr. Charles Riggs (fashion and textiles) received $14,000 as a subcontract from Texas Tech University on grant from the Texas Food and Fibers Commission for the period from Sept. 1, 2003 to Aug. 31, 2004 for continuation of the New Cleaning Procedures for Natural Fiber Products project. The project is designed to develop more environmentally friendly methods of cleaning sensitive textile fabrics.

Dr. Richard Nicholas (student life) and Dr. Monica Mendez-Grant (student life) received $5,052 for the period from Feb. 10, 2004 to Aug. 31, 2004 from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for the Go Center: TWU Collegiate G-Force Project. The mission of each G-Force chapter is to increase college enrollment rates of Texas high schools by providing resources to communities with active Go Centers. Collegiate G-Force chapters recruit students, faculty, staff and administrators to become G-Force members and provide assistance to communities with Go Centers.

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UPDATE ON TWU PEOPLE

Please submit “People” items (faculty and staff only) to the office of marketing and communication by campus mail or by e-mail to info@twu.edu. Include first and last names (no initials, please) and appropriate titles (ie. Dr.)

Dr. Sandra Cesario (nursing-Houston) will receive the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses 2004 Award of Excellence in Education on June 27 at the organization’s annual convention. The award honors an AWHONN member who is recognized by his or her peers as exemplifying the highest standards of nursing in the area of advocacy. AWHONN is a professional association for nurses who specialize in the care of women and newborns.

Dr. Robin Britt (nursing-Houston) has been named co-chair of the TWU Houston Center Building Campaign by Chancellor Dr. Ann Stuart. Dr. Britt begins the position in August.

Dr. Bill Cissell (health studies) has had two abstracts, which he co-authored with Dr. Rose Jones, cultural consultant to the Texas/Oklahoma AIDS Education and Training Center, accepted for the XV International AIDS Conference to be held in Bangkok, Thailand, in July. The titles are: “Multidisciplinary Approach to Initiating HIV Clinical Trials in Rural Communities,” and “AIDS Conspiracy Theories and Their Impact on Treatment in Rural Communities.”

Heather Speed (Center for Student Development) and Trisha VanDuser (Center for Student Development) will present “A Seamless Approach to Orientation” at the International Conference on the First Year Experience, June 14-17 in Maui, Hawaii.

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THE NEXT TWO WEEKS AT TWU: May 17-30, 2004

May 17-21

Sat., May 22

Sun., May 23

May 24-28

Sat., May 29

Sun., May 30


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